Recently Added Forgiveness Quotes

  • All
    < Prev 1 of 96 Next >
  • 1

    A Favorite of 4 users

    Please forgive me for all my mistakes.
    Please forgive me for taken you for granted.
    Please forgive me for doubting you.
    Please forgive me for assuming the worst.
    Please forgive me for pushing you away.
    Please forgive me for not going with my heart so many times.
    Please forgive me is all I ask. I promise you I never meant any harm. I just didnt know. I wasnt looking hard enough. I replay alot of things in my mind. And feel so bad.I never meant to hurt you. I wasnt judging you on anything from my past, I assure you of that. I just never felt about anyone like I do about you. And alot of times I was so overwhelmed with feelings and emotions. Things I hadnt felt in so long. That my mind became so overwhelmed and I just got tired and lost. And im sorry I thought the worst. I know now we are connected so when I feel something you pick up on it and vice versa. I know better now. Im still overwhelmed at times but not with negative thoughts only positive. As I said before im actually really shy and I get nervous around you. Not because of anxiety because you calm me from that. I just get overwhelmed with the feelings I have for you. It will get better but please just be patient with me.

    A few days ago by MirrorMirror in Forgiveness  ID#:634670
  • 2

    A Favorite of 1 user

    A heartfelt appology has three parts.
    Step 1: Tell them what you feel
    Usually, we start by saying “I’m sorry” to express remorse. “I’m sorry” is more effective when we elaborate on our remorseful feelings. For example, “I’m so sorry and sad to hear that my lack of communication has made you so angry and resentful.” Or, “I’m so sorry and embarrassed that my comment caused such an uproar.”
    Just share the remorseful feelings, please. It is not constructive is succumb to—and share—feelings of resentment or defensiveness, like, “I’m sorry…you’re being so petty and critical.”


    Step 2: Admit your mistake AND the negative impact it had

    This is the hardest part, because it requires admitting responsibility for our actions or behavior. This can feel impossible if we don’t really think we did much wrong, or if our intentions were good.

    Ask yourself: How is the other person feeling? What did I do that caused that feeling? Could I have done something differently?

    Then acknowledge these things. Empathize with the offended person; the most important thing is that you demonstrate that you are trying to understand how they feel. (Don’t apologize until you actually do understand how they are feeling; if you can’t put yourself in their shoes, your apology will ring false.)

    For example: “I can see that my comment hurt your feelings, and that you are feeling misunderstood and uncared for.”

    Or to your partner you might say, “I know that it was wrong of me to call you out in front of the whole family, and that you are angry because I’ve hurt your credibility with the kids. I’m sure that was embarrassing, and it was a mistake for me to do that.”

    Feeling unforgiven? Try forgiving yourself

    This is where most of us are tempted to offer an explanation for our behavior. When in doubt, leave the explanation out; trying to explain away our actions can seem like we’re being defensive, or making excuses. (Remember, the point is to repair the relationship, not make the other person see that you were right.)
    Step 3: Make the situation right

    Good apologies include a reparation of some kind, either real or symbolic. Maybe you create an opportunity for the person you embarrassed to regain credibility. Or perhaps you admit your mistake to others, too, as a part of the reparation. In many relationships, a hug is a great reparation.

    Often, all we need to do is explain what we are going to do differently the next time so that we don’t repeat the offending action or behavior. This helps us rebuild trust and repair the relationship.

    If you aren’t sure how to make it right, just ask, “Is there anything I can do to make this up to you?”

    So its
    1.Im sorry
    2.Its my fault
    3.What can I do to make it Right.
    Most forget the 3rd part.

    A few days ago by MirrorMirror in Forgiveness  ID#:634340
  • 3

    A Favorite of 4 users

    I forgive others not because I accept their behavior. I forgive for me so I can move on and find peace. Sometimes people make mistakes and say mean things. That doesn't define their love for you or who they are. Or who you are. No ones perfect were only human.

    Posted by MirrorMirror in Forgiveness  ID#:633197
  • 4

    A Favorite of 2 users

    Just because it doesn't come in a pretty package doesn't mean it's not a great gift; sometime the greatest gifts are accepted as soon as we open our eye's.

    Posted by free2bme in Forgiveness  ID#:632478
  • 5

    A Favorite of 1 user

    “Forgive us,” I say.
    Have said.
    Will always say.

    Posted by ChrisThatMixer in Forgiveness  ID#:632269
  • 6

    A Favorite of 1 user

    Age has many beautiful gifts but one we could live without is the pride and resentment we hold onto when we argue with others.. The forgiving, free spirit of children is our true nature.. Remember this when you feel stubborn :)

    Posted by *♥BelievingInMiracles♥* in Forgiveness  ID#:631050
  • 7

    A Favorite of 1 user

    “Harbors were built for ships, not resentments.”

    Posted by Darwindidnt in Forgiveness  ID#:630890
  • 8

    A Favorite of 1 user

    I've come to terms that you won't come back I understand it and I respect it , your decision to leave was all yours to make but please don't come back and tell me that you miss me because my heart couldn't possibly do this all over again , I'm moving on to better things I hope you'll do the same .

    Posted by thegirlhelost in Forgiveness  ID#:630674
  • 9

    A Favorite of 1 user

    "Forgetting is actually Forgiving"...that's why forgiving is so difficult!

    Posted by Namra Aziz in Forgiveness  ID#:630266
  • 10

    A Favorite of 7 users

    Life is amazing; we end up doing things once we thought that we will never do. We always say that we shouldn't turn back whatever it is happy or sad moments. But sometimes it's good to turn back . . . . back when things are finally trying to fall on place after falling apart for so long.

    Posted by sadikshapoudel in Forgiveness  ID#:629879
< Prev 1 of 96 Next >

Please confirm your action.